Accessible Web Components Without Tears

So, you’ve built an amazing new web application. It uses all the latest frameworks and libraries. It’s beautiful to behold.

But is it accessible? Many web applications these days are built on top of pre-existing frameworks or code bases and there is little thought to how well these components will work for different assistive devices.

This talk will look at a range of common application components and how they can be made accessible – quickly and easily – for all users. We’ll look at how to notify users when changing the DOM after page load. We will also look in-depth at accessible form validation, modal windows, drop-down menus, in-page tabs and other commonly used we components. You will leave this talk ready and eager to enhance your application, and in the process, make it available to entirely new audiences.

slides: [http://www.slideshare.net/maxdesign/building-accessible-web-components-without-tears]

Many web applications these days are built on top of pre-existing frameworks or code bases and there is little thought to how well these components will work for different assistive devices.

 

A range of common application components can be made accessible – quickly and easily – for all users, including forms, modal windows, drop-down menus, in-page tabs and other commonly used web components.

 

A simple way for a web developer to understand accessibility is to try to navigate a site using only a keyboard. If they cannot perform all tasks without issues, tell which element is in focus at any time or tab around the page in a logical order, then that site has accessibility issues.

 

Fluency or even dependence on libraries and frameworks can lead to developers forgetting core web principles: basic HTML, CSS, accessibility and progressive enhancement.

 

If we want to make our sites available to the widest possible audience, we have to include people with various types of disability, many of whom use assistive devices for input (keyboards, trackpads, head wands, puffers, switches, touch screens, voice activated software) and output (text browsers, screen readers, magnifiers, Braille devices).